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Architecture Unbound: A Century of the Disruptive Avant-Garde by Joseph Giovannini (In-Person Event)

12/08/2021 - 6:00pm

 

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8 AT 6 PM EASTERN

Rizzoli is pleased to invite you to celebrate the publication of Architecture Unbound: A Century of the Disruptive Avant-Garde, with author Joseph Giovannini in conversation with Elizabeth Diller, principal of the firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and architect Bernard Tschumi.

Please register here.

RIZZOLI IN-PERSON EVENT COVID POLICIES:

In-person events will be presented to a fully vaccinated audience at full capacity. All attendees are required to wear masks. All patrons over the age of sixteen will be required to show proof* of having completed the COVID-19 vaccination series at least 14 days prior to the date of the event. 

*Proof of vaccination will be defined as either an original vaccination card or an Excelsior Pass. 

 Registration will be required.

 

 

ABOUT THE BOOK

In Architecture Unbound, noted architecture critic Joseph Giovannini takes us to architecture’s wilder shores as he traces a century of the avant-garde to transgressive and progressive art movements that roiled Europe before and after World War I, and to the social unrest and cultural disruption of the 1960s. Manifestos produced during this pivotal and fertile period opened the way to tentative forays into an inventive, anti-authoritarian architecture in the next decade. Built projects broke onto the front pages and into public awareness in the 1980s, and took digital form in the 1990s, with large-scale international projects landing on the far side of the millennium.

As Giovannini writes in the Prologue, "With strategies of explosion, collision, and fragmentation, architects were introducing forces that dislocated architecture’s system of thought and construction predicated on gravity. Architects produced fresh astonishments, some fantastical. The buildings worked, and they worked well, but perhaps their highest and best function was to fascinate.”

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joseph Giovannini is a practicing architect who has written on architecture and design for four decades for such publications as the New York Times, Architectural Record, Art in America, and Art Forum, and he has served as the architecture critic for New York Magazine, the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He has also taught widely in graduate architecture programs.

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