Churchill's American Network: Winston Churchill and the Forging of the Special Relationship

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CHURCHILL'S AMERICAN NETWORK: WINSTON CHURCHILL AND THE FORGING OF THE SPECIAL RELATIONSHIP
Churchill's American Network: Winston Churchill and the Forging of the Special Relationship
$29.95
Available In Store
Description
A revelatory portrait showing how the famed British statesman created a network of American colleagues and friends who helped push our foreign policy in Britain's favor during World War II

Winston Churchill was the consummate networker. Using newly discovered documents and archives, Churchill's American Network reveals how the famed British politician found a network of American men and women who would push American foreign policy in Britain's direction during World War II--while at the same time producing lucrative speaking fees to support his lavish lifestyle.

Stelzer has gathered contemporary local newspaper reports of Churchill's lecture tours in many American cities, as well as interactions with leaders of local American communities--what he said in public, what he said at private meetings, how he comported himself. Readers observe Churchill as he is escorted by an armed Scotland Yard detective, aided by local police when Indian nationalists threaten to assassinate him, while he travels in deluxe private rail cars provided by wealthy members of his network; and as he recovers from a near-death automobile crash--with the help of liquor prescribed by a friendly doctor with no use for Prohibition.

The links in Churchill's network include some of fascinating American figures: the millionaire financier Bernard Baruch; the railroad magnate, Averell Harriman, who became an FDR-Churchill go-between; media moguls William Randolph Hearst (and wife and mistress); Robert R. McCormick--who attacked Churchill's policies but enjoyed his company--and Charles Luce, who made him TIME's Man of the Year and later Man of the Century; and bit players such as Mark Twain, Charlie Chaplin, and David Niven.

It is no accident that Churchill was able to put these links together into an important network that served to his, and Britain's, advantage. He worked at it relentlessly, remaining in close contact with his American friends by letter, signed copies of his many books, and by attending to their needs when they were in Britain. Many of these colleagues were invited to dinners at Chartwell and, later, Downing Street. Perhaps most importantly, Churchill's network of American allies had Franklin Roosevelt's ear while the president was deciding how to overcome opposition in congress to helping Britain take on the threat from Germany.

Description
A revelatory portrait showing how the famed British statesman created a network of American colleagues and friends who helped push our foreign policy in Britain's favor during World War II

Winston Churchill was the consummate networker. Using newly discovered documents and archives, Churchill's American Network reveals how the famed British politician found a network of American men and women who would push American foreign policy in Britain's direction during World War II--while at the same time producing lucrative speaking fees to support his lavish lifestyle.

Stelzer has gathered contemporary local newspaper reports of Churchill's lecture tours in many American cities, as well as interactions with leaders of local American communities--what he said in public, what he said at private meetings, how he comported himself. Readers observe Churchill as he is escorted by an armed Scotland Yard detective, aided by local police when Indian nationalists threaten to assassinate him, while he travels in deluxe private rail cars provided by wealthy members of his network; and as he recovers from a near-death automobile crash--with the help of liquor prescribed by a friendly doctor with no use for Prohibition.

The links in Churchill's network include some of fascinating American figures: the millionaire financier Bernard Baruch; the railroad magnate, Averell Harriman, who became an FDR-Churchill go-between; media moguls William Randolph Hearst (and wife and mistress); Robert R. McCormick--who attacked Churchill's policies but enjoyed his company--and Charles Luce, who made him TIME's Man of the Year and later Man of the Century; and bit players such as Mark Twain, Charlie Chaplin, and David Niven.

It is no accident that Churchill was able to put these links together into an important network that served to his, and Britain's, advantage. He worked at it relentlessly, remaining in close contact with his American friends by letter, signed copies of his many books, and by attending to their needs when they were in Britain. Many of these colleagues were invited to dinners at Chartwell and, later, Downing Street. Perhaps most importantly, Churchill's network of American allies had Franklin Roosevelt's ear while the president was deciding how to overcome opposition in congress to helping Britain take on the threat from Germany.

ISBN
9781639364855
Publisher
Publication Date
February 5, 2024
Binding
Hardcover
Item Condition
New